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Section 11
Detecting Earthquake Waves

In this section you will find materials that support the implementation of EarthComm, Section 11: Detecting Earthquake Waves.


Inquiring Further

  1. To learn more about the history of earthquake studies, visit the following web sites:

    "The Early History of Seismometry (to 1900)" by James Dewey and Perry Byerly, USGS  
    Series of "chapters" which detail the early development of instruments used to detect and measure earthquake activity.

    A Brief History of Seismology to 1910, Institute for Crustal Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara
    Read about early explanations for earthquakes and the start of the "modern era" of seismology around 1750. Follow the development of the science of earthquake study.

  2. To learn more about recent seismic activity and how seismic waves travel through the Earth, visit the following web sites:

    Recent Earthquakes, USGS
    Review a list of the most recent earthquake activity for the world. Click on the earthquake of interest to read an "Earthquake Bulletin" which gives an epicenter location map, seismic history of the area, p-wave travel times, and arrival time data for that earthquake.

    Seismic Monitor, IRIS Consortium, University of Washington
    Map is updated every 30 minutes - shows locations of earthquakes as well as seismic events on or near nuclear test sites.

    Seismometers, Seismographs, and Seismograms, etc., USGS
    Explains how seismographs work, includes diagrams of seismographs and also reviews P and S wave motion and explains how to read Travel-Time curves.

  3. To learn more about how seismograms are used to find the distance to an earthquake epicenter, visit the following web sites:

    Welcome to Virtual Earthquake, California State University
    Provides an interactive Web-based activity designed to introduce you to the concepts of how an earthquake epicenter is located and how the Richter Magnitude of an earthquake is determined.

    Welcome to Earthquake, California State University
    Provides an activity that illustrates how seismic waves are used to determine the magnitude of an earthquake and to locate its epicenter.

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Resources

To learn more about this topic, visit the following web sites:

Seismometers

Seismometers, Seismographs, and Seismograms, etc., USGS
Explains how seismographs work, includes diagrams of seismographs and also reviews P and S wave motion and explains how to read Travel-Time curves.

How are Earthquakes Studied?, Michigan Technological University
Includes a photograph and description of the first device used to detect earthquakes and an illustration showing how seismograms are generated.

"The Early History of Seismometry (to 1900)" by James Dewey and Perry Byerly, USGS
Series of "chapters" which detail the early development of instruments used to detect and measure earthquake activity.

Interpreting Seismograms

How Do I Read a Seismogram, Michigan Technological University
Includes images to help you to learn to read seismograms.

Seismometers, Seismographs, and Seismograms, USGS
Descriptions of how seismometers, seismographs, and seismograms are used to monitor volcanic eruptions.

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