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Section 2
Igneous Rocks and the Geologic History of Your Community

In this section you will find materials that support the implementation of EarthComm, Section 2: Igneous Rocks and the Geologic History of Your Community.


Inquiring Further

  1. To learn more about Ship Rock, Sierra Nevada Batholith, and Devil’s Postpile, visit the following web sites:

    Ship Rock, Emporia State University

    Yosemite National Park, California, NPS

    Devil's Postpile National Monument, California, NPS

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Resources

To learn more about this topic, visit the following web sites:

The Nature of Igneous Rocks

Igneous Rocks, Volcano World
View a slide show about igneous rocks. The lesson is part of a series of lessons called "Rocks and Minerals."

Igneous Rock Tour, California State University Long Beach
A self-guided tour through igneous rocks with hand sample and outcrop pictures of different igneous rocks. Also includes a quiz with an answer key.

Magma, Lava, and Igneous Rocks

Magma, Volcano World
Find out more about how the chemical composition of magma varies in igneous rocks. The discussion is not limited to just extrusive rocks, but includes intrusive rocks as well.

Magma, Lava, Lava Flows, Lave Lakes, etc., USGS
Learn more about lava and the hazards associated with lava flows.

Classifying Igneous Rocks: Texture

Atlas of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks, Minerals, and Textures, University of North Carolina
See examples of plutonic (intrusive igneous rocks) and volcanic (extrusive igneous rocks).

Volcanic Rocks, Glendale Community College
Contains an informative chart, pictures, links, and descriptions of the different classifications of igneous rocks.

Classifying Igneous Rocks: Chemical and Mineral Composition

Volcanic Rocks, Glendale Community College
Contains an informative chart, pictures, links, and descriptions of the different classifications of igneous rocks.

20th Century Volcanic Eruptions and Their Impact, USGS
Learn about several case studies and find links for further information about each eruption.

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