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Suggested Workshop Schedules

 

 

Introduction
Capsule Presentation
Day-Long Workshop
Week-Long Workshop

 

INTRODUCTION

This section outlines suggested schedules for capsule presentations (one hour), one-day sessions, and weeklong workshops. In each, the morning of day one is the same because it provides a general overview of EarthComm through direct experience with one chapter (in this case the volcanoes chapter is suggested, but that may be changed to fit local needs.) In each schedule, too, it is intended that the 5-E lesson model be used as the overarching structure. The second is a weeklong schedule that expands what is done in the day-long workshop. Adjusting these can create other formats. Note that times given on the right are elapsed time.

In developing these schedules it was assumed that each day would include six hours of session time and a one-hour lunch, making a seven-hour day. Within the session time there are two fifteen-minute breaks each day, one each in the morning and the afternoon. Lunch is placed after three session hours, leaving three more in the afternoon (e.g. a workshop starting at 9am would take lunches at noon and would disperse at 3pm each day.)

CAPSULE PRESENTATION

This is a one to two hour presentation. If you have more than two hours for your presentation, use extra time to develop individual sections and respond to questions from your audience.

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DAY-LONG WORKSHOP


Outline
Detailed Plan

Printable Outline
Printable Detailed Plan

Day -Long Workshop Outline

STAGE
ACTIVITY
TIME

Engage

Introductions of facilitators

Logistical check (parking, restrooms, etc.)

Overview of morning, mentioning the central questions given below

Introductions of participants

Introductions of general purpose: To get to know EarthComm

The central questions in this workshop format are:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

:00

Explore

  • What are your goals coming into the workshop?
  • What questions do you have coming in?
  • What goals do you have for an Earth science curriculum?

:10

Explain

EarthComm "Goals and Expectations"

Student Expectations

Teacher Expectations

:20

 

End the discussion of general goals by relating some of what has been said to the intended goals of EarthComm as given in "Overview of EarthComm," which may be handed out separately or found in the front matter of any teacher's edition.

Elaborate

Begin Volcanoes chapter
Present opening for Volcanoes

  • Volcanoes and your community
  • Chapter Challenge
  • Expectations

:30

Initiate Activity 1: Where are the volcanoes?

:40

Introduce 5-E model

:50

Discuss Volcano activity 1 in terms of the 5-E model

Engage

Getting Started

Explore

Investigate

Explain

Think It Over

Elaborate

Find Out More, Inquiring Further

Evaluate

Applying What You Have Learned
Preparing the Chapter Report

 

Discuss how chapter elements contribute to the 5-E model

Engage

Chapter Introduction
Chapter Challenge
Activities in chapter

Evaluate

Completing the Chapter Report

Handout: "EarthComm Curriculum Design"


Initiate Activity 2: Volcanic Landforms

1:15

Break (15 minutes)

1:45

Evaluation

At the conclusion of the break, discuss the first two activities

2:00

Engage

Begin discussion of EarthComm Key Concepts

2:15

Explore

Discuss the first two key concepts

Relevance

Chapter Challenge relates to impact on student

Community

Activity 1 relates content to community

Explain

The ideas of relevance and community call for a different treatment of content than is typical in many Earth science curricula.

Discuss the concept of systems in general

Elaborate

Show the overhead "Earth Systems" and discuss.

Evaluate

Have the participants consider ways in which different Earth systems (spheres) interact to create flows.

Read through one of the four remaining activities in the chapter. If time allows, and if materials such as geologic maps and rocks are available, they can be handed out and participants can work through activity 5, "Volcanic History Of Your Community."

Hand out the essay "Why Use An Earth Systems Approach?" and ask participants to read it during the lunch hour.

This section of the morning is intentionally flexible so that it can be made more or less structured in response to the group, and time. (Note that the fourth key concept, inquiry, has not been addressed yet. That will follow lunch.)

Closure for morning

2:45

Lunch

3:00

Open afternoon section

  • Go over Checkpoints and discuss how issues will be addressed
  • Review the three key concepts addressed thus far: relevance, community, and systems.

4:00

Engage

Both the community concept and the system concept are open ended, which leads into the final key concept of inquiry.

4:10

Explore

Initiate chapter 3 in the Earth's Natural Resources module, "Water Resources and Your Community."

Pace the groups through the first two activities in this chapter.

Note: Other chapters may be used here. It would be good to learn of local interests prior to the workshop and arranging to do chapters that suit those interests.

Explain

Show the image "A Model of Scientific Inquiry" and discuss.

Discuss "Correlation to the National Science Education Standards."

4:45

Elaborate

Share and discuss the "Outcomes of Inquiry-Based Science Education"

Evaluate

Have participants return to their groups and discuss the role of inquiry in the two activities done so far

While both of the prior activities were inquiries of a sort, they did not involve the students in actually carrying out the plan by which data were obtained (other than direct measurement of the building, if that was actually done.) In activity 3, the students do devise such a plan, and are able to carry it out. In the limitations of a workshop it is not likely that groups can complete this plan, but it would be possible for students.

5:00

Activity 4 can be completed quickly, assuming the data are available.

5:20

Break (as convenient)

Activity 5 and activity 6.

5:30

Discuss "Managing Collaborative Group Learning."

6:15

Initiate discussion of assessment.

6:30


Day-Long Workshop: Detailed Plan

STAGE
ACTIVITY
TIME

Day 1

Engage

Introductions of facilitators

Logistical check (parking, restrooms, etc.)

Overview of morning, mentioning the central questions given below

Introductions of participants
Introductions of general purpose: To get to know EarthComm

The central questions in this workshop format are:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

:00

Explore

  • What are your goals coming into the workshop?
  • What questions do you have coming in?
  • What goals do you have for an Earth science curriculum?

You may want to use a "speaking stick" method here (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics") so that the etiquette of open sharing without interruption is established. During this session, write down what is offered without comment, but make mental notes as to what issues will and will not be addressed in the workshop as planned. Consider possible modifications. For those whose ideas will not be addressed, it would be worthwhile to discuss this with them privately, such as during a break, and make suggestions as to how they can reach those goals in other ways. The purpose of doing this now is that it allows you to have a sense of what the teachers are looking for, so that you can adjust as possible, and it gets them talking.

Handout "Overview of EarthComm"

Briefly describe the development process and tell what role, if any, the workshop leaders have had in that process.

Overhead: Development Timeline

:10

Explain

EarthComm "Goals and Expectations"

End the discussion of general goals by relating some of what has been said to the intended goals of EarthComm as given in "Overview of EarthComm," which may be handed out separately or found in the front matter of any teacher's edition.

Student Expectations

Teacher Expectations

:20

Elaborate

 

 

 

Begin Volcanoes chapter:

  • Present opening for Volcanoes
  • Volcanoes and your community
  • Chapter Challenge
  • Expectations

:30

Initiate Activity 1: Where are the volcanoes?

  • Briefly locate where this activity fits in the modular/chapter scheme
  • Establish groups, either by counting off or by seating, hand out materials.
  • Allow participants to begin working on the activity, but tell them that they will have only ten minutes or so to work.

:40

"Modules & Chapters"

Introduce 5-E model

5-E Lesson Cycle

Discuss Volcano activity 1 in terms of the 5-E model

Engage

Getting Started

Explore

Investigate

Explain

Think It Over

Elaborate

Find Out More
Inquiring Further

Evaluate

Applying and Understanding What You Have Learned
Preparing the Chapter Report

Discuss how chapter elements contribute to the 5-E model

Engage

Chapter Introduction
Chapter Challenge
Activities in chapter

Evaluate

Completing the Chapter Report

Handout: "EarthComm Curriculum Design"

:50

Initiate Activity 2: Volcanic Landforms

Ask participants to consider the elements of the 5-E model as they proceed, as well as the goals and expectations that have been discussed.

This is a longer activity. Taking the break at the end of this will allow for those who do not finish at the same time as others to complete their work.

1:15

Break (15 minutes)

1:30

Ask participants to refer to "EarthComm Big Ideas," "Goals and Expectations for Teachers," and "Goals and Expectations for Students" as they return from break with the intent of discussing which of them the two activities they have done address.

1:45

Evaluation

At the conclusion of the break, discuss the first two activities in terms of the "Big Ideas," and "Goals and Expectations."

Keep this short. It is primarily intended to get them focused on those elements of the program, there will obviously be some areas not addressed by these two activities, as well as several that are.

Note: If available, this would be an opportune time to discuss the relationship between EarthComm and any state or local standards.

Overhead: EarthComm Big Ideas
Overhead: EarthComm Goals and Expectations for Teachers
Overhead: EarthComm Goals and Expectations for Students

2:00

Engage

Begin discussion of EarthComm Key Concepts

Explain that EarthComm differs from other Earth science curricula (See "Key Concepts".) It is important to understand those differences to appreciate the potential of the curriculum.

2:15

 

Explore

Discuss how each of the first two key concepts relates to the activities that have been done. In that these two are more familiar, the teachers are likely to be able to present many ideas.

Relevance Chapter Challenge relates to impact on student Community Activity 1 in particular relates content to community

Community, as it is used in EarthComm may take some development. Use overheads showing overlapping biological and political communities to emphasize that the concept can be defined in multiple ways. (See overheads section for "Nebraska Surface Cover and Counties" image, as well as instructions for how to create that image for any location in the U.S.)

STOP HERE for a moment. The introduction of Systems will take some time, and is outlined in more detail.

Explain

When the ideas of relevance and community are brought together, they call for a different treatment of content than is typical in many Earth science curricula. The overlapping and shifting boundaries of what is considered a "community" lends itself to a systems-based approach to Earth science content.

Discuss the concept of systems in general. The text and activities given in this manual (see also the "Additional Workshop Activities" section) describe the general components of systems using several examples. Go over these as necessary and as time allows. In EarthComm there is usually not explicit treatment of the components of systems, but for the teachers to understand them strengthens their ability to make use of that aspect of the program.

2:25

Elaborate

Show the overhead "Earth Systems" and discuss some of the interactions that participants already know of between the spheres. Have participants start working through the third activity, "Volcanic Hazards: Flows" be done in conjunction with this discussion.

Overhead: Earth Systems

Evaluate

 

Have the participants consider ways in which different Earth systems (spheres) interact to create flows, and are affected by flows (note that the whole notion of "hazards" is dependent on the idea that some part of the biosphere is being negatively affected by some other sphere.) It is more important that the participants make the connection with systems than that they finish this activity.

Some examples:

  • cryosphere interacts with geosphere in generation of lahars
  • geosphere, topography in particular, affects hydrosphere in terms of where pyroclastic flows and lahars actually go
  • geosphere affects biosphere as homes and living things are destroyed by pyroclastic flows and lahars

In groups of four, assign one participant in each group to read through one of the four remaining activities in the chapter and prepare to discuss it with respect to how it illustrates the interactions of Earth systems. Provide two to three minutes for reading and discussion, then ask a member of each group to share for about one minute. When groups are finished, they can begin considering what students might create in response to the chapter challenge.

If time allows, and if materials such as geologic maps and rocks are available, they can be handed out and participants can work through activity 5, "Volcanic History Of Your Community." Many people are surprised to find that igneous rock types, or sedimentary rocks with volcanic origin (e.g. tuff) exist near their community. Again, the concept of community may be defined more or less broadly here. Examples of student work will be shared in the afternoon as assessment is discussed.

Hand out the essay "Why Use An Earth Systems Approach?" and ask participants to read it during the lunch hour.

This section of the morning is intentionally flexible so that it can be made more or less structured in response to the group, and time.

(Note that the fourth key concept, inquiry, has not been addressed yet. That will follow lunch.)

Handout: Why Use An Earth Systems Approach?

Closure for morning

  • Summary of morning
  • Overview of afternoon and expected afternoon start time
  • Checkpoint (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics")

2:45

Lunch

3:00

Evaluate

The afternoon will focus on two important elements of EarthComm, the key concept of inquiry and how it is incorporated into the program, and assessment.

Open afternoon section

Go over Checkpoints and discuss how issues will be addressed

Review the three key concepts addressed thus far: relevance, community, and systems.

Show the images provided in this manual "Lancaster County, NE and Associated Watersheds," and "Nebraska Watersheds In The Missouri River Basin and Counties." Similar images for any location in the United States can be generated using the steps given in the Overheads section of this manual. In viewing these images, the concept of community is readily apparent. Attention often turns to community as a political concept, so Lincoln is seen as a community within Lancaster County. It is also readily apparent that both the city and county are influenced by the interactions of the hydrosphere and the geosphere as they form watersheds. The same can be said of the second image, but on a larger scale.

Overhead: Lancaster County, NE and Associated Watersheds

Overhead: Nebraska Watersheds In The Missouri River Basin, And Counties

4:00

Engage

Both the community concept and the system concept are open ended in that they do not have a single correct definition. This feature can be used to open a discussion about definitions taking on meaning within the context of specific investigation, which leads into the final key concept of inquiry. Ask them to consider the role of inquiry in the activities that follow.

Explore

Initiate chapter 3 in the Earth's Natural Resources module, "Water Resources and Your Community" by reading Getting Started, Scenario, Chapter Challenge, and Assessment Criteria. Invite the participants to scan ahead as the Assessment Criteria suggest.

Note: Access the data for Activity 1 prior to the workshop and have the tables available for use by the participants.

Pace the groups through the first two activities in this chapter.

Note: Other chapters may be used here. It would be good to learn of local interests prior to the workshop and arranging to do chapters that suit those interests.

4:10

Explain

Show the image "A Model of Scientific Inquiry" and discuss how it is like and unlike similar models of "the scientific method" that they have encountered. Discuss the strengths and limitations of such models. You may want to read the quote from the AAAS given at the beginning of this manual:

Scientific inquiry is not easily described apart from the context of particular investigations. There simply is no fixed set of steps that scientists always follow, no one path that leads them unerringly to scientific knowledge. (P.4)

Overhead: A Model of Scientific Inquiry

Discuss the kinds of skills that the participants know are used in inquiry.

Overhead: Science Process Skills

Handout: "Correlation to the National Science Education Standards"

4:45

Elaborate

Share and discuss the "Outcomes of Inquiry-Based Science Education"

Overhead: "Outcomes of Inquiry-Based Science Education"

Evaluate

 

Have participants return to their groups and discuss the role of inquiry in the two activities done so far. Some ideas that might be shared include:

In activity 1, the students were using primary data to draw conclusions about their community's water use and sources of water. The conclusions that they reach regarding the contributions of different aspects of the water cycle will be unique for their community, which suggests that this is an authentic inquiry.

The authenticity of the inquiry is even more pronounced in "Applying What You Have Learned" section. There are many skills called on in generating a response.

In activity 2, a model is used. This model is a particularly strong illustration of a system. By combining this model with the information they gained in activity 1, the students can begin to draw more specific conclusions about their community.

5:00

While both of the prior activities were inquiries of a sort, they did not involve the students in actually carrying out the plan by which data were obtained (other than direct measurement of the building, if that was actually done.) In activity 3, the students do devise such a plan, and are able to carry it out. In the limitations of a workshop it is not likely that groups can complete this plan, but it would be possible for students.

Activity 4 can be completed quickly, assuming the data are available.

5:20

Break (as convenient)

5:30

Evaluate

 

 

 

Activity 5 and activity 6 each require some preparation, but are worth the time. Each can be used to summarize the key concepts that have been discussed with respect to EarthComm. These two activities also provide ample opportunity to discuss issues of managing hands-on inquiry. Safety considerations can also be explored. In that the teachers are experienced in these areas, these discussions should be largely based on their experience and expertise. The handout "Managing Collaborative Group Learning" addresses some additional intricacies of the social dynamics of group work.

Handout: "Managing Collaborative Group Learning"

5:45

Initiate discussion of assessment. Examples of student work from the chapters done in the workshop can be shared. Discussions of the rubric provided in the teacher's edition for each chapter could follow. It is important to discuss the subjective character of project-based assessment. Each teacher will have to make expectations clear to students for each Chapter Report. The rubric provides a guide, and opportunities for defining expectations can be discussed in conjunction with each activity.

Provide examples of chapter tests to demonstrate the availability of traditional assessments in EarthComm that can be used as local contexts demand.

6:15

Begin closure

Ask participants to help organize the room.

Return to goals and expectations lists made in the morning. Discuss issues that may not have been covered through the day. However, many such issues are likely to be related to local conditions, for which the workshop leaders can offer ideas, but not hard answers.

Review the "Big Ideas" and "Module and Chapter" outline of EarthComm. Again, discuss how this relates to local standards and curriculum guidelines.

Return central questions in this workshop:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

Ask for additional questions.

Hand out the workshop evaluation material.

6:30

Thank participants and close.

7:00

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WEEK-LONG WORKSHOP

In the weeklong workshop time is not as much of an issue, so many activities that were skimmed in the day-long can actually be performed. The schedule below follows the same general approach as the day long version with some expansions. The final three days are largely taken up with participants demonstrating activities.

Outline
Detailed Plan

Printable Outline
Printable Plan

Week -Long Workshop Outline

STAGE
ACTIVITY
TIME

Day 1

Engage

Introductions of workshop leaders

Logistical check (parking, restrooms, etc.)

Overview of morning, mentioning the central questions given below

Introductions of participants: Ice Breaker Activity

Introductions of general purpose: To get to know EarthComm

The central questions in this workshop format are:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

:00

Explore

  • What are your goals coming into the workshop?
  • What questions do you have coming in?
  • What goals do you have for an Earth science curriculum?

Development process

:30

Explain

EarthComm "Goals and Expectations"

:50

Elaborate

Begin Volcanoes chapter

Present opening for Volcanoes

  • "Volcanoes and Your Community"
  • "Chapter Challenge"
  • "Expectations"

1:00

Initiate Activity 1: Where are the volcanoes?

1:10

Introduce 5-E model

Discuss Volcano activity 1 in terms of the 5-E model

Engage

Getting Started

Explore

Investigate

Explain

Think It Over

Elaborate

Find Out More

Inquiring Further

Evaluate

Applying What You Have Learned

Preparing the Chapter Report

Discuss how chapter elements contribute to the 5-E model

Engage

Chapter Introduction (usually titled the same as the chapter)

Chapter Challenge

Activities in chapter

Evaluate

Completing the Chapter Report

1:30

Break

1:45

Elaborate

Initiate Activity 2: Volcanic Landforms

2:00

Discuss "Big Ideas"

2:20

Evaluation

Discuss the first two activities in terms of

  1. "Goals and Expectations for Teachers" and
  2. "Goals and Expectations for Students."
  • Closure for morning
  • Summary of morning
  • Overview of afternoon and expected afternoon start time
  • Checkpoint (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics")

Lunch

3:00

Evaluation

Resume after lunch, go over Checkpoint and discuss

4:00

Engage

Begin discussion of EarthComm Key Concepts

Explore

Name the two concepts, "relevance" and "community."

Relevance

Chapter Challenge relates to impact on student

Community

Activity 1 in particular relates content to community

Explain

Discuss the concept of systems in general.

Elaborate

  • Show "Earth Systems" and discuss.
  • Initiate activity 3: "Volcanic Hazards: Flows"

4:40

Evaluate

Relate "Earth Systems" to activities

Initiate activity 4: "Volcanic Hazards: Airborne Debris"

5:10

Break

5:25

Evaluate

  • Initiate activity 5: "Volcanic History of Your Community"
  • Initiate activity 6: "Volcanoes And The Atmosphere"
  • Initiate activity 7: "Monitoring Active Volcanoes"

5:40

Bring closure to the unit "Completing the Chapter Challenge"

6:10

Begin closing the day

Ask participants to help organize the room.

Return to the central questions in this workshop:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

Questions.

Checkpoint

6:25

Thank participants and close.

7:00

Day 2

Evaluate

Reminders (workshop leaders' names, logistics. etc.)

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 1 end of day

Overview of morning

Reiterate points from yesterday:

:00

Scientific inquiry.

Initiate Chapter 2: Earthquakes and Your Community

Read:

Chapter opener, "Earthquakes and Your Community"

Chapter Challenge

Expectations

1:00

Activity 1, "An Earthquake In Your Community," quickly.

Complete activity 2: Detecting Earthquake Waves.

Complete activity 3: How Big Was It?

1:15

Break

1:45

Resume

Complete activity 4: Earthquake History of Your Community

Complete activity 5: Moderating Earthquake Damage

Complete activity 6: Designing "Earthquake-Proof" Structures

Checkpoint

2:00

Lunch

3:00

Resume, review Checkpoint input

Complete Chapter 3: Plate Tectonics and Your Community

4:00

Include a break

5:30

Begin discussion of assessment

Introduce the group sharing task

Do the "passion points" activity. (Assign groups over night.)

Checkpoint

6:00

Close for the day

Evening social event (optional)

7:00

Day 3

Evaluate

Reminders

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 2 end of day

Overview of morning

:00

Share group assignments with participants.

:10

Initiate discussion of how EarthComm relates to various standards.

Checkpoint

:25

Lunch

3:00

Resume, review Checkpoint input

4:00

Break

5:30

Resume

5:45

Discussions of implementation issues.

Checkpoint

6:30

Close for the day

7:00

Day 4

Evaluate

Reminders

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 3 end of day

:00

Overview of morning

Groups have one hour to complete their preparations and practice

:10

Group I: Understanding Your Environment

Checkpoint

1:10

Lunch

3:00

Resume, review checkpoint

Group II: Earth's Fluid Spheres

4:00

Break

5:35

Resume

5:50

Closure

Checkpoint

6:50

Day 5

Evaluate

Reminders

Last day logistics-adjustable.

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 4

:00

Discussion of student naive conceptions in Earth science

:30

Break

1:10

Resume

1:25

Group III: Earth's Natural Resources

Checkpoint

2:55

Lunch

3:00

Resume

Group IV: Earth System Evolution

4:00

Break

4:30

Resume

4:45

Unresolved Issues Discussion

Review of workshop goals

5:15

Review of key concepts, program structure, what makes it different

Workshop evaluation

Workshop leaders available for individual issues

5:30

All done

6:00


Week-Long Workshop: Detailed Plan

STAGE
ACTIVITY
TIME

Day 1

Engage

Introductions of workshop leaders

Logistical check (parking, restrooms, etc.)

Overview of morning, mentioning the central questions given above

Introductions of participants

In that time is not as much of an issue, and group cohesion is, it is worth taking the time for an icebreaker activity that gets the participants talking to each other. One suggestion is:

Icebreaker-A chance for participants to get up and meet each other. This can be anything that gets everyone up and talking to others, introducing themselves, and so on. An activity that we have used is:

"Letters From Earth": Each participant writes a clue for each of her or his three initials. The clues are definitions for terms related to Earth science. They are written on a card, which is taped, pinned, or hung on each individual. So, I might be

A vibration in the Earth's crust

One of seven large landmasses on the Earth

A flowing body of water that drains a large area of land

Someone could then guess that the words are Earthquake, Continent, and River. Since my initials are ECR (Edward C. Robeck) they'd know that much about me. Once they get a person's initials, the person completes the introduction, telling her or his name to the guesser. If they cannot guess, the guesser can ask up to four yes/no questions before the introduction is made.

Introductions of general purpose:

  • To get to know EarthComm

The central questions in this workshop format are:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

:00

Explore

  • What are your goals coming into the workshop?
  • What questions do you have coming in?
  • What goals do you have for an Earth science curriculum?

You may want to use a "speaking stick" method here (see above in "Techniques for Group Dynamics") so that the etiquette of open sharing without interruption is established. This question may take participants off guard, especially if they are attending the workshop as a requirement of administrators. It is important, however, to let the participants know that it matters to you what they are thinking and what their priorities are.

During this session, write down what is offered without comment, but make mental notes as to what issues will and will not be addressed in the workshop as planned. Consider possible modifications. For those whose ideas will not be addressed, it would be worthwhile to discuss this with them privately, such as during a break, and make suggestions as to how they can reach those goals in other ways. The purpose of doing this now is that it allows you to have a sense of what the teachers are looking for, so that you can adjust as possible, and it gets them talking.

Handout: "Overview of EarthComm" or refer to front matter of teacher's edition*

Briefly describe the development process and tell what role, if any, the workshop leaders have had in that process.

Overhead: Development Timeline

:30

Explain

EarthComm "Goals and Expectations"

End the discussion of general goals by relating some of what has been said to the intended goals of EarthComm as given in "Overview of EarthComm," which may be handed out separately or found in the front matter of any teacher's edition.

:50

Elaborate

Begin Volcanoes chapter

Present opening for Volcanoes

  • "Volcanoes and your community"
  • "Chapter Challenge"
  • "Expectations"

1:00

Initiate Activity 1: Where are the volcanoes?

Establish groups, either by counting off or by seating, hand out materials. Allow participants to begin working on the activity, tell them that they will have twenty minutes or so to work.

Monitor the groups. As group members finish, invite them to begin looking through the Teacher's Edition for Volcanoes. Ask them to consider how the activity fits into the broader scheme of the curriculum.

Briefly locate where this activity fits in the modular/chapter scheme

Handout/Overhead: "Modules & Chapters"

1:10

Introduce 5-E model

Here is an opportunity to discuss relevant experiences that the participants have had with similar models of instruction. This is also an opportunity to watch for those who might enjoy sharing their experiences enough that they could impede the flow of the workshop. Usually spending extra time with these individuals on breaks helps to address their needs.

Overhead: 5-E Lesson Cycle

Discuss Volcano activity 1 in terms of the 5-E model

Engage

Getting Started

Explore

Investigate

Explain

Think It Over

Elaborate

Find Out More

Inquiring Further

Evaluate

Applying What You Have Learned

Preparing the Chapter Report

Discuss how chapter elements contribute to the 5-E model

Engage

Chapter Introduction (usually titled the same as the chapter)

Chapter Challenge

Activities in chapter

Evaluate

Completing the Chapter Report

1:30

Break

1:45

Elaborate

Initiate Activity 2: Volcanic Landforms Ask participants to consider the elements of the 5-E model as they proceed, as well as the goals and expectations that have been discussed.

Handout: "EarthComm Curriculum Design"

2:00

Discuss "Big Ideas"

The second activity in this unit is a good place to discuss the "big ideas" because it relates well to so many of them. For example:

Big Idea 1. Earth Science literacy empowers us to understand our environment, make wise decisions that affect quality of life, and manage resources, environments, and hazards.

The activity is very obviously related to the "decisions" part of this, which is exemplified in the Chapter Challenge, considering where your relatives might want to move, and "hazards" for obvious reasons.

Big Idea 3. Change through time produced Earth, the net result of constancy, gradual changes, and episodic changes over human, geological, and astronomical scales of time and space.

As one of the more familiar, dramatic Earth science phenomena, volcanoes demonstrate both episodic changes (eruptions) and gradual changes (e.g. the recovery of the volcanic area.) Recognizing that the face of the Earth has changed in both of these ways can help learners understand scales of time, as well.

2:20

Evaluation

Discuss the first two activities in terms of "Goals and Expectations for Teachers" and "Goals and Expectations for Students."

Keep this short. It is primarily intended to get them focused on those elements of the program, there will obviously be some areas not addressed by these two activities, as well as several that are.

Note: If available, this would be an opportune time to briefly discuss the relationship between EarthComm and any state or local standards. A more expanded discussion will follow (on Day 2) so this is really just a way to get the participants thinking in this direction.

Closure for morning

Summary of morning

Overview of afternoon and expected afternoon start time

Checkpoint (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics")

2:45

Lunch

3:00

Evaluation

Resume after lunch, go over Checkpoint and discuss

4:00

Engage

Begin discussion of EarthComm Key Concepts

Explain that EarthComm differs from other Earth science curricula (See opening paragraph under "Key Concepts" .) It is important to understand those differences to appreciate the potential of the curriculum.

Explore

Name the two concepts, "relevance" and "community" and ask the participants to suggest what is meant by each and how each plays a role in Earth science education. Compare and contrast traditional approaches with more reform-based, student-centered approaches.

Discuss how each of the first two key concepts relates to the activities that have been done. In that these two are more familiar, the teachers are likely to be able to present many ideas.

Relevance

Chapter Challenge relates to impact on student

Community

Activity 1 in particular relates content to community

Community, as it is used in EarthComm may take some development. Use overheads showing overlapping biological and political communities to emphasize that the concept can be defined in multiple ways. (See overheads section for "Nebraska Surface Cover and Counties" image, as well as instructions for how to create that image for any location in the U.S.)

STOP HERE for a moment. The introduction of Systems will take some time, and is outlined in more detail.

4:25

Explain

When the ideas of relevance and community are brought together, they call for a different treatment of content than is typical in many Earth science curricula. The overlapping and shifting boundaries of what is considered a "community" lends itself to a systems-based approach to Earth science content.

Discuss the concept of systems in general. The text and activities given in this manual (see also the "Additional Workshop Activities" section) describe the general components of systems using several examples. Go over these as necessary and as time allows. In EarthComm there is usually not explicit treatment of the components of systems, but for the teachers to understand them strengthens their ability to make use of that aspect of the program.

Elaborate

Show the overhead "Earth Systems" and discuss some of the interactions that participants already know of between the spheres. Have participants start working through the third activity, "Volcanic Hazards: Flows" be done in conjunction with this discussion.

Overhead: "Earth Systems"

Initiate activity 3: "Volcanic Hazards: Flows"

4:40

Evaluate

Have the participants consider ways in which different Earth systems (spheres) interact to create flows, and are affected by flows (note that the whole notion of "hazards" is dependent on the idea that some part of the biosphere is being negatively affected by some other sphere.) It is more important that the participants make the connection with systems than that they finish this activity.

Some examples:

  • cryosphere interacts with geosphere in generation of lahars
  • geosphere, topography in particular, affects hydrosphere in terms of where pyroclastic flows and lahars actually go
  • geosphere affects biosphere as homes and living things are destroyed by pyroclastic flows and lahars

NOTE: Let the next several activities flow smoothly, with limited comment between them. It is important to the participants' understanding of the chapter structure that the next three activities be done in a steady flow, with all of the parts of the activity addressed, especially the "Preparing the Chapter Report" section of each. The "Inquiring Further" ideas are optional, but should not be allowed to interrupt the flow of the activities greatly. The idea is to end the day having completed an entire unit, with time for discussion of the Chapter Challenge.

Model good management techniques here. A discussion of managing hands-on science will follow on Day 2, but it will be helpful if there has been good modeling. Some suggestions are provided in the "Managing Collaborative Group Learning" section of the Teacher Edition. Other suggestions include:

  • consider traffic flow and place materials to avoid congestion,
  • hand out materials that might present hazards, and discuss the hazards,
  • have participants set up materials before proceeding, check their set ups,
  • ask participants to signal when they are at given points in the lesson, so that it is clear how closely paced the groups are,
  • have a plan for cleaning up materials that involves the participants.

Initiate activity 4: "Volcanic Hazards: Airborne Debris"

This is a good activity to do after the discussion of Earth systems (spheres) in that it demonstrates obvious relationships between the geosphere and atmosphere-the volcano affecting air quality. Through the reading "Find Out More-Airborne Releases" in which Mount St. Helens is discussed, there is also an obvious connection of the geosphere to the biosphere and to the hydrosphere.

5:10

BREAK

5:25

Evaluate

Initiate activity 5: "Volcanic History of Your Community"

Emphasize the use of regional information. It could be said that "community" is defined in terms of geology in this case in that the boundaries being considered are those around an area of similar geologic history.

This is also a good place to emphasize the different approach that is being taken to conventional Earth science knowledge-rock types. In this activity igneous rocks are considered in the context of what information they offer about the history of a region, rather than as a set of names to be learned. The point here is that while EarthComm addresses conventional Earth science content, as many more traditional curricula do, it does so in a way that is considered more pedagogically sound.

5:40

Initiate activity 6: "Volcanoes And The Atmosphere"

Initiate activity 7: "Monitoring Active Volcanoes"

The last two activities in this chapter are very open ended. They are a good ending point for the day in that they raise several issues related to the last key concept to be discussed in detail, inquiry. How far to have participants go in completing these activities is a matter of time, workshop leaders' expertise, and materials. These are the same issues that teachers face in decisions regarding open-ended inquiry. At least let the participants design the apparatus for each, and discuss possible results.

 

5:55

Bring closure to the unit

Read the section "Completing the Chapter Challenge" and have participants compose a brief response. Ask for volunteers to share each group's response. Discuss with the participants what they think students might do in response to the challenge. If available, share some of the projects done by actual students.

6:10

Begin closing the day

Ask participants to help organize the room.

Return to goals and expectations lists made in the morning. Discuss issues that may not have been covered through the day. Many such issues are likely to be related to local conditions, for which the workshop leaders can offer ideas, but not hard answers. One area that has not been addressed is the issue of teaching through inquiry. This is intentional. In past workshops it is this topic that raises many difficult issues among teachers. It is best to leave this until later, when possible, to give it ample discussion time. Managing hands-on science, which can be seen as part of inquiry, must also be left. A third area that is likely to come up is the question of assessment. This, too, will take some time, and will be addressed in day 2.

Review the "Big Ideas" and "Module and Chapter" outline of EarthComm. Again, discuss how this relates to local standards and curriculum guidelines.

Return central questions in this workshop:

  • What is EarthComm?
  • How might your teaching change (or not) when you use EarthComm?
  • How might students' learning change when they use EarthComm?

Ask for additional questions.

Handout Checkpoint form and explain where to leave it (this should be done anonymously, with the workshop leaders out of the room.)

6:25

Thank participants and close.

7:00

Day 2

Evaluate

Reminders (workshop leaders' names, logistics. etc.)

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 1 end of day

Overview of morning

Reiterate points from yesterday, ask for participant input:

  • How is the entire EarthComm curriculum structured? Modules, Chapter, Lessons
  • What is the instructional design format of the lessons? The 5-E model
  • What are the five "E's"? Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate
  • What are the key concepts that distinguish EarthComm from some other curricula? Relevance, Community, Systems, Inquiry

Reiterate that inquiry is the key concept that has not yet been addressed. That will begin today's session.

:00

Use a Delphi technique (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics") activity to elicit ideas about inquiry. It is vital that the entire technique be explained before beginning so that participants understand what is to be done with the ideas they write. The purpose for doing this as a Delphi is to allow participants to raise ideas and have them valued. This is an area in which the workshop leader may have only as much as, or even less (or more), expertise than the participants, as practicing teachers, so it is worthwhile to let the participants have input.

In the Delphi technique each participant begins writing (it is best to pass out paper so everyone's is the same) in response to a sentence stem that is put on the overhead. In this case a good sentence stem would be:

When I think about teaching using an inquiry-based approach, what I think about is...

They should NOT put their name on their papers.

Overhead: Sentence stem

Participants have two minutes to write. They are asked to forego worrying about spelling, grammar, punctuation, or even-to some extent-clarity in favor of letting their ideas come out as fully as possible. After the two minutes (in which workshop leaders may also be writing if they choose) time is called and everyone hands in his or her paper. The papers are redistributed and each participant reads the ideas of another participant and responds to those ideas in a one-minute time block. This is repeated at least one time so that everyone has written one original entry and responded to the ideas of others twice.

NOTE: A good way to pick up papers is to gather them from half of the participants first, then shuffle them, and hand one of those out to the remaining half of the participants as you pick up each of the remaining papers. The second half of the papers can then be redistributed to those whose papers were collected first without fear of anyone getting his or her own paper. In the second round (and more if it seems beneficial) of response writing, it is OK if someone gets his or her own paper.

:15

Share responses. Ask participants to read or simply state responses they found interesting, important, insightful, or simply worth considering. The ideas can be their own, or someone else's, or may be ideas that just come to mind during the discussion. You may want to use a "speaking stick" strategy (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics") so that all participants can be heard.

As participants give their input, do not respond to each idea, just record it where everyone can see it (chalkboard, overhead, chart paper.) Look for broad headings that the ideas can be put into such as: Rationales/Incentives (for using inquiry-based instruction), Issues/Barriers, How To, Definitions. The specific headings will come out of what is said, but these are some that have worked.

Areas that often come out include:

  • Inquiry requires (encourages) the use of many skills.
  • Inquiry involves students in the work of scientists.
  • Inquiry requires many materials that have to be managed.
  • Inquiry is often uncomfortable for students who are not used to it.

:25

Point out that the fourth key concept, as they by now know, that permeates EarthComm is inquiry-based Earth science instruction. There are several things to keep in mind with respect to teaching through inquiry.

Scientific inquiry is NOT always "the scientific method."

Overhead: A Model of Scientific Inquiry

Scientific inquiry uses many skills, and many lists of such skills have been produced, two are given here.

Discuss the kinds of skills that the participants know are used in inquiry.

Overhead: Science Process Skills

Handout: "Correlation to the National Science Education Standards" or refer to front matter of teacher's edition.

Many kinds of activities contribute to scientific inquiry. While inquiry is often considered open-ended, and it is fundamentally in that the answers/solutions are not known at the outset, not everything that contributes to inquiry is open-ended. For example, becoming familiar with a known set of ideas is not open ended, but it can contribute to the formation of new ideas. Some "cookbook" science activities, which are not open-ended, can contribute to a more overarching inquiry (such as the Chapter Challenge) that is open-ended. What is more important is that inquiry-based instruction work toward outcomes that make it possible for students to become independent inquirers. Understanding this can help resolve some of the differences in approach and definition that might be found among participants.

Share and discuss the "Outcomes of Inquiry-Based Science Education"

Overhead: "Outcomes of Inquiry-Based Science Education"

:45

This initial discussion of inquiry-based teaching does not address management issues. The first activity in Chapter 2 of the "Earth's Dynamic Geosphere," which addresses Earthquakes, provides a good opportunity for this in that the activity is not one that can be easily repeated, and so must be managed well so that all students see the results.

Review the structure of EarthComm and situate the volcanoes chapter in relation to the other chapters so that the participants understand that it is one (but not necessarily the first) of three chapters in the module.

Initiate Chapter 2: Earthquakes and Your Community

Read:

Chapter opener, "Earthquakes and Your Community"

Chapter Challenge

Expectations

Have participants skim activity 1, "An Earthquake In Your Community," quickly.

Ask: "Before we begin, what might you do in a classroom to manage this activity?"

Ideas might include:

  • Have sets of materials already on tables when students arrive, or place them around the room so that students can collect them easily.
  • Have all of the students set up the apparatus and wait for a signal before doing step 2, so that they are all together when they do it. They can then proceed to step 3, but should wait before beginning Part B.
  • Keep Slinkys from students until everyone has completed part A. Then, ask the students to suggest "Do's" and "Don'ts" when using a Slinky.

It might be helpful for them to recall the activities that they did yesterday and the management strategies that they observed the facilitators using.

Have participants begin activity 1 and complete both parts. Have copies of the essay "Managing Collaborative Group Learning" available for participants to look at when they have finished.

1:00

Discuss the considerations given in the essay. Again, experienced teachers will have many good ideas related to these issues. Have the participants consider management issues as they do the second activity. For example, one of the main issues may be the need for some students to support other students who are having difficulty with the graphing concepts.

NOTE: Now the intent is for the participants to move steadily through the remaining activities of chapter 2 and 3 of this module, so that a discussion of the relationship between the chapters in a module can be undertaken in the afternoon. Chapter 2 will be completed before lunch, Chapter 3 will follow lunch. The day will end with a discussion of last remaining major issue, assessment.

Before and after each activity, make an effort to tie it to the overall scheme of the chapter, especially with respect to the Chapter Challenge. Do not let groups go on ahead. If they have extra time, they can begin looking at the descriptions of the remaining modules and considering with chapter(s) they would like to help lead.

Complete activity 2: Detecting Earthquake Waves.

Complete activity 3: How Big Was It?

1:15

Break

1:45

Evaluate

Resume

Complete activity 4: Earthquake History of Your Community

Complete activity 5: Moderating Earthquake Damage

Complete activity 6: Designing "Earthquake-Proof" Structures

NOTE: Activity 6 can take some time. If there is not enough time left before lunch it would be good to postpone the completion of the activity, and the discussion of the Chapter Challenge, until after lunch.

2:00

Ask groups to consider how students might respond to the Chapter Challenge.

Share impressions of the chapter, with emphasis on issues related to inquiry and management. This is a good time to discuss the use of Internet resources, the availability of which will vary. Some resources are mentioned in most of the activities in the program.

Tell participants that they will be expressing their choices for chapters they will help to help present over the next two days. They will not be leading all of the chapter activities, but will help to present the chapter in a way that helps the other participants become familiar with it. This will include doing at least one activity, describing the others, and discussing the Chapter Challenge.

Over lunch they should read the descriptions of the chapters to they know which they might like to work with. Explain the "passion points" procedure (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics") so that they understand that they should be ready with several choices (and to imply that they may not get their first choice.) They will express their choices at the close of the day.

Checkpoint

2:45

Lunch

3:00

Evaluate

Resume, review Checkpoint input

Complete the activities in Chapter 3: Plate Tectonics and Your Community

4:00

Include a break

5:30

Evaluate

Begin discussion of assessment

Have the participants look at samples of student work from the module. Ask them to refer to the scoring rubrics provided in the Teachers Editions and consider how they would score the products. They should also refer to the "Expectations" provided for each chapter. It may be necessary to go over the use of rubrics such as those that are included in the program. It is especially important to make it clear that these are guides, and that individual teachers are likely to want to develop their own more specific criteria that they then share with their students.

Discuss traditional assessments - sample end of chapter exams provided in the Teacher Guide for each EarthComm module.

Explain that over the next two days, starting after lunch tomorrow, the participants will be working in groups to present modules to the other participants. They will have the materials for one activity in each chapter, and will describe the rest, including the Chapter Challenges. They will have ninety minutes to present the module, including the activities, and to lead a discussion that addresses:

  • the key concepts and how they relate to the module (relevance, etc.)
  • management of the activities
  • assessment of the chapters

Point out, if it has not already come up, that there has not yet been an extended discussion of the curriculum relative to local, state, and national standards. That will be taken up tomorrow morning.

Do the "passion points" activity. (Assign groups over night.)

Checkpoint

6:00

Close for the day

NOTE: It may be that it would be a good idea to schedule a social event for the participants this evening or the next. This is especially the case if some of the participants are from out of town and/or do not know the others well. Participants can become a strong support network for each other and sharing a positive experience outside the context of the workshop can help develop that network. It is good if the event can be related to Earth science.

Events might include:

  • visiting a zoo, museum, and/or nature center and discussing (lightly) how Earth systems are being modeled or modified,
  • touring a local planetarium and/or observatory,
  • taking a driving tour of a natural area and collecting (if permitted) samples of rock, fossils, and so on.

7:00

Day 3

Evaluate

Reminders

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 2 end of day

Overview of morning

NOTE: This schedule is being developed with the assumption that the entire workshop is being undertaken within a given classroom space and is entirely focused on EarthComm. This leaves quite a bit of time in the week long session for overviews of modules. This time could be shortened without severely limiting the presentations if there are opportunities to modify the schedule to take advantage of facilities and/or individuals that could enhance the workshop. Such modifications might include:

  • a visit to a government, district, or other facility that might be able to provide participants with supplemental materials (e.g. a NASA Core Center or state geological survey.)
  • presentation(s) by Earth scientists regarding current research topics
  • an opportunity to spend time in an Internet-capable computer lab so that various sites mentioned in EarthComm could be visited and explored (a summary list of these would be a good resource.)

These modifications could be inserted into this day or the next, either in the morning or in the afternoon, or both. They should be kept to about two or three hours maximum, however. Presentations of modules would then be one hour rather than ninety minutes, with any remaining time taken out of lunch, breaks, and minor adjustments to discussions.

:00

Share group assignments with participants.

Have them break into their groups and begin considering how they might present the material. This is a brief session designed to get them thinking. They will have more time for planning in the afternoon.

:10

Initiate discussion of how EarthComm relates to various standards.

The exact format for this discussion will depend on the materials on standards available and how much is already provided in terms of correlations to those standards. The goal is for the teachers to recognize that EarthComm addresses many, if not all, curriculum standards for content and pedagogy.

Begin by having participants suggest content that should be covered in any good Earth science curriculum. Make a list. You may want to use a "speaking stick" technique (see "Techniques for Group Dynamics".) You may also want to provide photocopies of currently used Earth science textbooks from the district.

Focus the participants' attention on the EarthComm "Big Ideas," which have been touched on earlier. Divide the participants into groups of five or six. Assign each group one or two of the "Big Ideas" and ask them to look for places in Earth's Dynamic Geosphere that those ideas are addressed. Also have them look for items made on the content list above. These are the expert groups for a "jigsaw" activity.

After ten minutes have one or two members from each of these groups reorganize into sharing groups. Have each participant share what was found in Earth's Dynamic Geosphere for each of the big ideas and for one or two topics on the list (in this latter part, the topics on the list should be shared one or two at a time so that one individual does not cover the whole list.) This sharing can go on for twenty to thirty minutes.

:25

Pass out copies (or copies of sections) of the National Science Education Standards. These may be available in the district, or they may be printed from the Internet at:

http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/html/

It is important to make the point here that science teaching is much more than the content and part of what EarthComm brings is a strong pedagogical model that also is addressed in the Standards. EarthComm also addresses other aspects of the standards, such as "Science In Personal And Social Perspectives" in a very integral manner. Looking at only the content is useful, but the consideration of the curriculum's benefits should not stop there.

Also hand out the "Correlation to the National Science Education Standards" that is in the front of the Teachers Edition. Again have participants work in groups to identify where in EarthComm various aspects of the standards can be found. Response will vary, but the point will be made that EarthComm addresses the standards in many places.

Finally, repeat the correlation procedure with state and/or local standards.

Adjust the timing of these correlation activities to fit available resources. In contexts that have many layers of standards, it may be most workable to divide the participants into groups and have them work at various levels. Dividing the participants into six groups for example, would allow two groups to work on national standards, while two groups work on state standards, and two groups work on local standards. Groups working at the same level could then compare notes and discuss discrepancies before sharing with the rest of the participants.

NOTE: If participants are from different school districts they may be asked to bring copies of their district standards and share them with others.

Include a break. Begin sharing in time to be finished by about ten minutes before lunch. Bring closure by discussing what was found, again emphasizing the depth of EarthComm that goes beyond just addressing content issues.

Checkpoint

:55

Lunch

3:00

Evaluate

Resume, review Checkpoint input

Groups now have ninety minutes to shape their presentations. They should be provided with the supplies for the first activity in each chapter. They can try the activities that they will do and discuss ways of sharing responsibilities.

During the break the groups can discuss with the workshop leaders any special needs they have with respect to materials and equipment.

4:00

Break

5:30

Evaluate

Resume

Provide opportunities for discussions of implementation issues. Topics might include:

  1. How can a teacher prepare students for inquiry-based teaching when they are used to more structured and closed-ended approaches?
  2. To what extent should the teacher feel free to modify a program like EarthComm and how might one go about it?
  3. What might be some of the barriers to teaching in the way EarthComm promotes?
  4. What are some of the incentives for teaching in the way EarthComm promotes?

If these issues have not arisen from the group, they can be presented for discussion among group members. Some important points to make in discussion these particular issues are:

  1. Preparing students: Students are socialized into particular ways of "studenting." It is not unlikely that some will have trouble with open-ended approaches. They may feel uncomfortable, for example, being assessed through projects rather than through tests, because the criteria may be somewhat more subjective (and/or ambiguous.) It may be necessary for teachers to ease students into project-based assessment, and to give more structured directions early on, decreasing that structure as students become accustomed to what is expected. It may also be that at first there may be a greater reliance for assessment on more concrete products (such as graphs produced in activities and their interpretation) than the Chapter report, with that reliance shifting over time.
  2. Establishing procedures for activities (such as safety procedures, where students get equipment, how they know when they can proceed and when they need to wait for the go ahead) may also help them feel more comfortable by giving them a structured context for the unstructured work they are to do.

  3. Teacher modification: It is entirely appropriate for teachers to modify EarthComm to fit the needs of their students, just as it is with any set of materials. In fact, developers count on teachers to make such adjustments. (Participants may want to share anecdotes about the kinds of modifications they have made.) EarthComm does not intend to be "teacher proof," but relies on the assumption that teachers have professional skills and expertise that they can use to make the minor adjustments needed to make EarthComm work well for their students.
  4. Barriers (see below for the flip side of each of these comments): There is a range of barriers to any reform-based curriculum. Administrators may not understand the changes, and may not be supportive of approaches that they are not used to. Parents may worry that their children are not getting all that they should out of the curriculum, especially if the children become frustrated (which at times they might as part of an inquiry-based learning process.) Students may not respond well at first to a new approach (see number 1, above.) Teachers may not have the knowledge base needed to feel entirely comfortable guiding students through inquiry-based lessons. There might be a lack of materials, and especially with respect to local information needed to highlight community relevance.
  5. Incentives: Administrators may recognize the need for innovative approaches that are standards-based. Parents may become excited when they see their children gaining interest in science through an understanding of its relevance to their own communities. Teachers may find a new sense of mission and empowerment in having a set of materials that enables them to teach in ways they know are good for their students. Having a strong curriculum to work with can provide the confidence needed to approach open-ended inquiry. Resources may be made available to support a curriculum that has a high level of credibility. Students may find new motivation for learning Earth science as they begin to appreciate its impact on their lives.

5:45

Provide participants time in their groups. Circulate among them and address issues. Make sure to have communicated with each group regarding their needs. They will have the first hour in the morning to finish preparations, and then presentations will begin. Try to put the participants at ease by making sure they understand that there are no judgments being made about their ability to teach. There are too many factors that are out of their control for that to be the case. Yet, the context does provide an opportunity for them to use their expertise to help others understand EarthComm, which is entirely the goal.

Checkpoint

6:30

Close for the day

7:00

Day 4

Evaluate

Reminders

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 3 end of day

Overview of morning

:00

Groups have one hour to complete their preparations and practice

(This can be adjusted if the time is not needed.)

This time can also incorporate break. No separate break will be taken.

:10

Group I: Understanding Your Environment

1:10

Checkpoint

2:55

Lunch

3:00

Evaluate

Resume, review checkpoint

It is important here to only share with the entire group those comments that are pertinent to the workshop leaders. Comments evaluating the participant presentations are not to be shared here as they may establish an evaluative mode, which can be counter-productive.

4:00

Group II: Earth's Fluid Spheres

4:05

Break

5:35

Evaluate

Resume

5:50

Closure

Checkpoint

6:50

Day 5

Evaluate

Reminders

In that this is the last day, some time is left for logistics-adjustable.

Review of Checkpoint input from Day 4 end of day (comments to workshop leaders only)

:00

Discussion of student naive conceptions in Earth science

(I'm working on this. I have a few articles that I want to do something with so as to make this work as an activity/discussion without a lot of reading by the participants. I think this is a vital area to address, and that this is a good time to do it since one group today is covering space topics, which is where some of the more troubling naive conceptions emerge. The Philips article (1991) is a good start.)

:30

Break

1:10

Evaluate

Resume

Group III: Earth's Natural Resources

1:25

Checkpoint

2:55

Lunch

3:00

Evaluate

Resume

Group IV: Earth System Evolution

4:00

Break

5:30

Evaluate

Resume

Unresolved Issues Discussion: By this time in a week-long workshop there may be issues that have been raised and have not been fully addressed due to lack of time. Often these emerge in the Checkpoints. Workshop leaders should be taking note of these. The issues can be opened to the participants for their ideas.

5:45

Review of workshop goals

Review of key concepts, program structure, what makes it different

6:15

Workshop evaluation

Workshop leaders available for individual issues

6:30

All done

7:00

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AGI's professional development programs for teachers are supported by generous contributions from corporate contributors of the American Geosciences Institute Foundation, the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Foundation, and ChevronTexaco.

 

 

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